How to Identify a safe Adult?

(from the Kids Help Phone website)

If you’re struggling with the changes the COVID-19 pandemic is bringing to your daily life, or if you’re struggling with abusesubstance use or anything else, remember to connect with a safe adult, you are not alone. There are things you can try to help make the situation better. It’s important to talk about what’s going on for you by reaching out to someone you trust A SAFE ADULT.

A safe adult is someone who is accountable, respects your boundaries and doesn’t ask you to keep secrets from others. Speaking to a safe adult can help you feel listened to and decide on next steps.

There are many ways to identify a safe adult in your life. A safe adult is:

  • Thoughtful: the person actively listens to you and believes you when you tell them something.
  • Trustworthy: the person is dependable, a confidant and someone you feel comfortable talking to.
  • Respectful:the person is mindful and considerate of your feelings — and your boundaries.
  • Helpful:the person provides guidance and helps you find solutions to problems.
  • Caring:the person does what’s best for you, puts you first and cares about your mental and emotional well-being and physical safety.

Who is a safe adult in your life? A safe adult in your life may be a relative, friend, teacher, guidance counsellor or anyone else you feel comfortable with and can trust.

Remember that support is available whenever you need it If you need a safe adult to talk to, you can always call a Kids Help Phone counsellor at 1-800-668-6868 https://kidshelpphone.ca/  or Tel-Jeune  at 1-800-263-2266 https://www.teljeunes.com/Tel-jeunes-en

 

Need help now? You can reach a counsellor

Kids Help Phone counsellor 24/7

What happens when you call or text or live chat?

First, you will hear a message that goes, “Hi! Welcome to Kids Help Phone.” You will then be asked to choose for service in either English or French.

Next comes a message about prank calls. Some young people are simply curious about what will happen if they call. Try to remember that our counsellors are here to help, but we need to keep the lines free for youth who need us.

Once you get through, a counsellor will ask how they can help you. Do not sweat it if you don’t know what to say. The counsellor will ask you a couple of questions to get the conversation going.

Call a counsellor at Kids Help Phone: https://kidshelpphone.ca/call

Text with a counsellor at Kids Help Phone: https://kidshelpphone.ca/text/

Live chat with a counsellor at Kids Help Phone: https://kidshelpphone.ca/live-chat/

At Tel-Jeunes 24/7 : https://www.teljeunes.com/Tel-jeunes

Call : 1-800 263-2266  / text : 514 600-1002 / live chat

How are other young people coping with social distancing?

Kids Help Phone has reached out to our National Youth Council (NYC) to hear how they’re coping with physical distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Here’s what young people like you had to say:

  • find a new daily routine (e.g. use a planner to map out your activities, etc.)
  • go for a walk/hike/run/etc. while maintaining distance
  • have a virtual Netflix party
  • play a board game with people in your living space
  • check in on friends by texting at least once per day
  • make plans for all of the things you want to do when social distancing is over
  • read
  • play with LEGO
  • do creative writing or journaling
  • bake
  • play video games
  • try DIY crafts on YouTube
  • have a bubble bath
  • do yoga
  • make a list of all the things you’re grateful for
  • try new looks (e.g. with clothing, makeup, etc.)
  • do a face mask
  • play/make music
  • clean or redecorate your room/living space
  • do a puzzle or word search
  • colour, draw or try graphic design
  • learn a new skill

Remember that support is available whenever you need it — you can always talk about whatever’s going on for you to someone you trust or a resource like Kids Help Phonehttps://kidshelpphone.ca/ or Tel-Jeune https://www.teljeunes.com/Tel-jeunes-en

How can I cope with social distancing?

Here are some tips you can use to adjust to physical distancing and take care of yourself during the outbreak:

  • consider different ways you can practise self-care
  • participate in a virtual Scout meeting or activity with other Scouts and Scouters (e.g. video chat, group call, etc.)
  • do Scouting at Home activities (find lots of ideas and resources to use and share with your family and friends at:

https://www.scouts.ca/programs/scouting-at-home/overview.html

  • host a virtual gathering with friends/family for #qualitytime (e.g. video chat, group call, etc.)
  • keep up your school workwith e-learning resources
  • find something to look forward to each day of the week (e.g. Monday is Scouts video chat night, Tuesday is movie night, Wednesday is pizza night, Thursday is game night, etc.)
  • call, text, email or chat with someone you haven’t connected with in a while
  • try a digital detoxto take a break from triggering headlines in the news
  • eat nutritious foods(you can spice things up in the kitchen by trying new recipes)
  • get creative with how you exercise(there are lots of fun home workouts available on things like YouTube)
  • catch up on sleep, rest and relaxation
  • smudge to cleanse your mind and environment​ 
  • try to be flexible as things continue to evolve and change                                                 

    Remember that support is available whenever you need it — you can always talk about whatever’s going on for you to someone you trust or a resource like Kids Help Phone https://kidshelpphone.ca/ or Tel-Jeune https://www.teljeunes.com/Tel-jeunes-en

How to cope with social distancing during COVID-19?

(from Kids Help Phone Web site)

‘’ Schools are closed, events are cancelled, no more sports, no more in-person Scouts meetings and activities, and I must keep social distancing so I cannot see my friends … as a result of the new coronavirus I must adjust to a lot of changes ….’’

What is social distancing?

Social distancing is about spacing people out to help slow down the spread of COVID-19. It’s also called physical distancing to help remind people it’s not about stopping social connection, it’s about giving ourselves room to avoid catching/spreading the disease.

Physical distancing may bring up different emotions for people.

  • Some people may value a slower pace of life and more time spent at home.
  • Some people may be dealing with feelings of stress, fear, anxiety and isolation/loneliness.

It’s totally understandable you may be feeling a range of emotions right now, but you can find comfort in knowing you’re not alone — we’re all going through this together.

It is important to:

  • wash your hands often and practise good hygiene (and encourage others in your living space to do the same)
  • avoid physical contact with people outside your living space
  • keep at least two metres (about six feet) of space between yourself and others in public
  • stay home as much as possible
  • stay away from crowded areas
  • be mindful of face-to-face contact with people who are more vulnerable to the virus (e.g. elderly people/people over age 65, people with other illnesses, etc.

Remember that support is available whenever you need it — you can always talk about whatever’s going on for you to someone you trust or a resource like Kids Help Phone https://kidshelpphone.ca/ or Tel-Jeune https://www.teljeunes.com/Tel-jeunes-en

Novel Coronavirus Update